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The All-Important Brain

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Update: I made a dedicated page for report sheets.  It’s here http://wp.me/PDtM3-47.  Also, you can find a Spanish to English translation sheet for nurses for free here.

Nurses often use a “report sheet” to take notes on our patients and remind of us of tasks that have to be completed before our shift ends.  These single sheets of paper are so important that we often call it, “our brain.”  Losing your report sheet halfway through the shift or accidentally dropping it in the iron clad “Shred-It” bin (done it) or toilet (done that too) can be devastating for your shift.

There are a lot of different templates floating out there that nurses use to keep track of patients. I’ve attached a few favorite, free report sheets.  Let me know your thoughts and send me your favorite “brain!”

Some brains to peruse:

1) Becky Report Sheet

2) Lindsay Report Sheet

3) Denise Night Report Sheet

4) Denise Day Report Sheet

5) Sarah: Four Patients, 7A Shift

6) Stephanie: 6 Patients, 7A shift

Explanation of abbreviations

Update:

I came upon a website that has a lot of report sheets on it. You can check it out here. This nursing website also has several. Just search for “report sheets.”

Update: I made a dedicated page for report sheets.  It’s here: http://wp.me/PDtM3-47.  There are more sheets there. One sheet I designed for students. The “Lindsay” sheet is the one I use.


What I’m Looking For

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Today I had the unfortunate distinction of repeatedly making my patient more uncomfortable.  Other than the fact that the guy is 90, he has another reason to be in pain—a broken bone.  On top of that, he is also constantly cold and despises having the covers pulled back. (He usually has eight blankets on him.)  During my 6 hours as his nurse, he was moved from the ED stretcher to his bed, then on a stretcher to X-ray where he had to sit for a film and was then put back in his bed.  About 15 minutes later he had to be moved back to the stretcher again to go for another test, and then put back to bed again.  He is mostly immobile.  This means that every time we transferred him we had to pull him from the stretcher to the bed and then roll him back and forth to remove the excess linens and pull sheet.  Then his heels had to be floated, a pillow put under one hip, the condom cath repositioned, and his heart monitor put back on.  All this motion had him flustered, uncomfortable, and in pain.  Finally, the last time we were repositioning him, moving the sheet, reattaching things, he sighed and said, “You know, if you just told me what it is you’re looking for in the sheets, I’ll gladly tell you where it is!”

At the Beach

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I was recently reminded of the day my sister came to shadow me at work.  When we walked into a patient’s room I asked him his name.  He stated it correctly.  I asked him if he knew where he was.  He smiled a slow, relaxed smile, leisurely locked his hands behind his head and said, “Yep, I’m at the beach.”  If only all our patients felt that way!