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Nursing Lingo Part 6: Walkie/Talkie

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For our latest installment of Nursing Lingo, we turn to another one of my favorites, “Walkie/Talkie.”  This phrase is darn near poetry.  It efficiently packs a whole lot of punch into just 4 syllables.

You might hear this while getting report.  I think my best definition of “Walking/Talkie” would be:

Noun person
1.  A patient who is alert and oriented x3, ambulatory, at very low risk for falls, and independent in activities of daily living.
2. A cake walk.

So, when you hear this phrase, you’re in luck!!  Would other nurses out there agree with the definition or modify it? Let me know!

Other Nursing Lingo Posts:

Part 5: CYA

Part 4: FLK

Part 3: Frequent Flyers

Part 2: DFO

Part 1: Circling the Drain

Nursing Lingo Part 5: CYA

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“CYA” is a term you hear all the time in health care.  It’s a great piece of nursing lingo but also a great piece of advice.  It means “Cover Your @$$.”

Perfect example: you have a patient whose potassium is high.  You page the doctor and suggest he intervene (give the patient kayexalate and a heart monitor, review their meds, etc.)  The doc decides to just wait it out.  What should you do?!?  CYA.  Chart what time you told the doc AND which doc you told.  Maybe the doc has a legitimate reason to wait and is making the right call.  However, you never know.  When in doubt, chart it.

Sadly, every nurse gets called to the mat eventually.  It could be a patient complaint, co-worker complaint, or even a lawsuit.  In the end, the only one who will protect your license is you.  So, follow policy, and chart, chart, chart!  It will save your butt in the end.

Nursing Lingo Part 4: FLK

Nursing Lingo Part 3: Frequent Flyers

Nursing Lingo Part 2: DFO

Nursing Lingo Part 1: Circling the Drain

Nursing Lingo Part 2: DFO

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Thanks to reader Terri for submitting the correct answer for what DFO means!  I’ll have to think of a good prize for you.  Customized medical Spanish-English list? Customized report sheet?  Guest post?

To set the scene of when I first heard DFO: I was doing my last rotation of nursing school so I had already deciphered most of the common medical acronyms.  But in report a veteran nurse  said a patient “DFO’ed.” I could have played it off like I knew what the word meant and then google it later.  But I could not think of ANYTHING that made sense.   DFO…?  Detached Forearm Operation?  No…  I gave up and asked.  Turns out DFO, at least here in the South, means Done Fell Out!  It’s actually a pretty great term that basically means “fainted.”  Usually the patient was standing, passed out, fell, and probably hit the floor.

Believe it or not, if you look in certain medical dictionaries, DFO is explained!

If a patient DFO’ed at home before they came in, that’s a bad thing.  If they DFO’ed at the hospital on your shift, that’s a very, very bad thing.  I say I have two rules for my patients, keep breathing and no falling. If your patients can stick to those two basic rules, your shift will be MUCH smoother for the both of you!

Next post will be on one of my favorite terms, “Frequent Flyers!”

Nursing Lingo Part 1: Circling the Drain

Nursing Lingo Part 3: Frequent Flyers

Free Medical Spanish to English Translation Card for Nurses

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I created a new page with a link to a resource for nurses.  It’s a free medical Spanish to English and English to Spanish translation card for nurses to use for free.  You can see and download it for free at this Bedpans page.

The All-Important Brain

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Update: I made a dedicated page for report sheets.  It’s here http://wp.me/PDtM3-47.  Also, you can find a Spanish to English translation sheet for nurses for free here.

Nurses often use a “report sheet” to take notes on our patients and remind of us of tasks that have to be completed before our shift ends.  These single sheets of paper are so important that we often call it, “our brain.”  Losing your report sheet halfway through the shift or accidentally dropping it in the iron clad “Shred-It” bin (done it) or toilet (done that too) can be devastating for your shift.

There are a lot of different templates floating out there that nurses use to keep track of patients. I’ve attached a few favorite, free report sheets.  Let me know your thoughts and send me your favorite “brain!”

Some brains to peruse:

1) Becky Report Sheet

2) Lindsay Report Sheet

3) Denise Night Report Sheet

4) Denise Day Report Sheet

5) Sarah: Four Patients, 7A Shift

6) Stephanie: 6 Patients, 7A shift

Explanation of abbreviations

Update:

I came upon a website that has a lot of report sheets on it. You can check it out here. This nursing website also has several. Just search for “report sheets.”

Update: I made a dedicated page for report sheets.  It’s here: http://wp.me/PDtM3-47.  There are more sheets there. One sheet I designed for students. The “Lindsay” sheet is the one I use.